16 octubre, 2016

Verethraqna, the Victory Spirit of Zoroastrianism


Verethraqna was one of the principal gods from Ancient Iran and Iranian world in general from the time of the Achaemenids. Apparently he survived the Zoroastrian reform form a previous cult, acquiring total relevance and a quite high position inside the pantheon with the new religion. He has been compared to Herakles and Ares in Seleucid period due to Hellenistic influence, fundamentally due to his principal attributes as hypostasis of Victory and for being known as the one who cannot be defeated in combat. Other names for him are Warharam, Vehram or Bahrām, as he is mostly known.


Verethraqna as a raven-warrior from Jessada-Art
Source:  http://www.deviantart.com/art/Verethragna-422778747

· Background: the myth of Indra and Vṛtra
Indian and Iranian worlds have always been closely related and the case of Verethraqna makes no exception. It is possible to trace the relation this character has with Vedic religion, the myth of god Indra and the serpent-monster Vṛtra most precisely. However, Major Rafnt wrote in 2015 the theory of Indo-Iranian origins of Verethraqna was not followed anymore[1].
The first connection is in the same name of the Avestan god, Verethraqna, that literally means «smiting of resistance» [2]. In Avestan language there are two significant words for this article and with the same root:  
· vərəθraγna, neuter substantive used as the name of the god
· vərəθraγan, adjective that means «victorious»
The adjective is not exclusive for the Victory spirit but also used to define other characters, both gods and heroes, and has its correspondence with the Vedic word vṛtrahán, famous epithet for god Indra. Among all his great deeds one of the most important victories of this god was smiting monster Vṛtra in a battle for the releasing of the creation waters, strongly parallel to the one fought between Tištrya and Apaoša. One of the theories regarding to the connection between Verethraqna and Indra proposes the former to be an echo of the latter, that is to say, with the religious reform of Zoroastrianism the epithets of the Vedic god would have been taken to build and magnify the figure of the Iranian god, stripping the dragon-slaying features. The second stronger theory stands that originally were two characters in Indo-Iranian world: the god and the dragon-slayer. Zoroastrianism would have stayed with the divine figure whereas Indie preferred to give supremacy to Indra as depicting him as monster murderer[3].
From both theories, Gherardo Gnoli chooses the first to be more possible, taking under account the main function of Indra was not killing dragons but hits was an addition. Nevertheless, the topic of the link Indra-Verethraqna is still a matter of discordances and many other theories exist about if it is possible to relate them or not. They cannot be described entirely, but can be found in the bibliography, in case someone is interested.


Immortal, from Macie J. Kuciara
Source:  http://www.deviantart.com/art/Immortal-156649935

· The Bahrām Yašt: the ten incarnations of Verethraqna
The spirit of Victory has his own hymn inside the Avesta, Zoroastrian sacred texts, which is commonly known as Bahrām Yašt and is the number 14 inside the compilations list. As in other yašt, it describes exhaustively this god and his characteristics. It is one of the most ancient sections inside the scriptures known as Young Avesta, although it seem to be composed as a patchwork as Christensen studied[4]. The scholar ended up concluding it is quite complicated to establish the difference between the parts belonging originally to Bahrām Yašt and what was taken from other hymns. Mary Boyce wrote that even if it was not totally preserved, it contains what seem to be archaic elements that lead to think about the true antiquity of this god and his cult[5].
Firstly it counts the ten forms this god could adopt and with which he appears before Zarathustra —what recalls the avatars of Viṣṇu in Purāṇic literature and the ten forms also Indra had[6]—. Each of these representations contains an important symbolic content and it would be a mistake considering them fortuitous of merely descriptively significant. The incarnations of Verethraqna are proof of to what extent he was powerful, covering practically the entirely of creatures and sacred elements in Zoroastrian world:
· A furious wind (Yt. 14.2-5). This is the initial form and the one with he comes to Zarathustra as the strong, the victorious and the chosen one. In addition these verses refer to his ability to heal and his relation with medicine.
· A bull with golden horns (v. 7). Upon these horns it is said to rest the Strength and the Victory, being them the ones who shaped the bones and covered them with gold.
· A white horse with golden ears and golden muzzle (v. 9). Here the previous description is repeated, being the virtues of the god floating upon the animal’s forehead.
· A camel (v. 11-13). The text depicts it as ready to mate with females, what highlights the sexual potency of the god and his patronage upon masculine virility. It is also linked to humans saying he lives among the abodes of men as part of the cattle, which he cares for as well, referring to its prosper reproduction.
· A boar (v. 15). This animal holds a special description since it is not a current wild boar but a kind of both fantastic and monstrous creature with several lines of sharp fangs and even horns. It is also a quite fast creature.
· A fifteen years old youngster (v. 17). Here describes his beauty and innocence alluding to the purity of his «clean» eyes.
· A falcon, raven or bird of prey (v. 19-21). This is one of the most famous forms, since it is described as the swiftest of birds, able to overtake the speed of an arrow. Its flight determines the night turning into day and its feathers have magical properties.
· A ram (v. 23). This ram possesses an incredible strength which uses charging with its rounded horns.
· A wild goat (v. 25). The horns of this goat are sharpened and ready for combat. The agility of the god to move in mountain territory is emphasised as well.
· An armed grown up warrior (v. 27). When Verethraqna finally presents himself as a man, he is described as completely armoured to face combat, with a shield and a golden blade sword inlaid with all sort of ornaments.
Some of these metamorphoses are not exclusive of Verethraqna. For instance, Tištrya could acquire the shape of the youngster, the bull or the horse (Yt. 8.13,16,20), the Xᵛarənah or Glory could appear as a raven (Yt. 19, 35) and the Wind divinity, Vayu-Vāta, presented himself as a camel or as an impetuous wind (Dk, IX, 23.2-3) [7].
After couting the incarnations, the X continues with the list of gifts the spirit awards Zarathustra with, beint the most important one the victory through thought, action and word. The latter refers to habitual rhetoric duels dating back from Indo-Iranian times[8]. As any other god, Verethraqna must be offered libations in the shape of sacred twigs and what Dhalla describes as «consecrated cooked repast of cattle», white if possible. However, not everybody could offer these presents to the god; only the virtuous and pure-hearted should do so. Calamity and disaster will befall upon those who dare to conjure the god being wicked, or upon the righteous who share those libations with the enemy. The texts describe the plagues will devastate their lands, illness will kill their families and Verethraqna himself will cut their hands and feet after depriving them from sight and hearing[9]. The intention of depicting the god as a powerful creature that must be respected and venerated but also feared for the terrible of is wrath is clear.

Kirin from Daren Horley
Source:  https://darenhorley.artstation.com/portfolio/47-ronin-kirin

· Verethraqna, more than a combat god
Georges Dumézil wrote: «in Indo-Iranian theology, the functions and functional gods were juxtaposed, thus justifying different moral codes for the different human groups»[10]. This indicates society was divided in different groups protected by diverse divinities as they had specific needs. Verethraqna, as one of the most prominent creatures of the pantheon, should cover all these groups one way or another.
As a representation of Victory he is directly related with military world, strength and combat skills. The evidences are the transformations that allude to his warrior behaviour, such as the bull, the ram, the goat or the boar. Nonetheless, not all his power had to do with fighting. For example, the shape of a camel referred to its patronage upon masculine virility and sexual potency, and the wind describes as well he has the ability to heal. Furthermore, the magic on his feathers in the raven shape links Verethraqna with magical elements used in shamanic rituals and exorcism, with the majority of the parallels located in India. There existed certain oracles based on the movements described by the falling of a falcon or raven feather[11].
The ten incarnations did not only refer to physical strength nor his warrior skills; six out of ten are shapes adopted for the race, alluding to speed and agility —the wind, the horse, the camel, the boar, the youngster, the raven[12]—. Verethraqna is considered a total spirit in the sense of his popularity and relevance among other Zoroastrian creatures made necessary he could cover all the functions previously described, making his position before the worshipers clear.
In an advanced moment of the cult, Sasanian period already, he was made patron divinity of travellers. The Zoroastrian reform and the passing of the time had great influence in this god, making him developing towards a more intellectual personality and making his actions more moral than literal[13]. According to Raftn he appears in the crowns of the Sassanian kings as a bird of prey or only depicted through his wings. There is a text, translated by Jean de Menasce, where Verethraqna is promoted to the category of Amesha Spenta, the Glorious Immortals accompanying Ahura Mazdā, cited by Dumézil[14].



· The three regions of the world
Inside the Zoroastrian cult, Verethraqna holds a very important connection with two other divinities: Mithra and Čistā, who represents the Sacred Conciousness —a role that later on will be in the hands of Daēnā —. At the Mihr Yašt, dedicated to the solar divinity, Verethraqna appears beside him in his terrible boar shape, willing to punish with the cruelty aforementioned those who dare to lie to Mithra, who also represents the sacred oath[15]. According to Avesta, Verethraqna and Čistā would be both companions of Mithra, and among their liturgies several connections can be found[16].
The yašt guarantee the spirit of Victory the total dominion of the three regions of the world: the sky, the earth and the water. This is possible thanks to the visual mastery of Verethraqna, which is of course required to get the victory. The eyes of the god relate him directly with universal order, the one that regulates creation. At the Bahrām Yašt, Zarathustra offers three sacrifices that are three times paid back with the same list of privileges apart from an extra element that refers to sight and that is linked to an animal:
· The Kara fish, whose sight is unlimited underwater
· A stallion, whose sight is unlimited upon the earth
· A bearded vulture, whose sight is unlimited from the height of the sky
Those three animals appear as connected to Čistā at the Dēn Yašt (number 16). Thus Verethraqna is linked to the cosmos entirely. As Georges Dumézil wrote: «This is another rendition of the god's special relation to the entire cosmos, a necessary attribute for him since, on the one hand, the only truly effective victory must be a total one, and, on the other, the universe, highly interested in the assailant god's victory, must contribute to it with all its elements»[17].


Bearded Vulture. Photography from Isak Pretorius
Source: 

· Curiosities
Japan has shown an increasing interest for Zoroastrian mythology and Verethraqna makes no exception. In the Japanese animated series Campione!, the main characters receives from Verethragna, a little powerful god of war, the ability to transform himself in ten different things to complete his mission. One of the images of the series shows a circle with the ten corresponding discs, that mix an iconography that goes from Mesopotamian to Greek, as well as his opening, where they appear one after the other and in the same order they do inside the yašt.


Disc with the ten incarnations of Verethraqna
Source: http://thecampione.wikia.com/wiki/Verethragna 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIKERMAN, E.: «Anonymous Gods», in: Journal of the Warburg Institute, vol. 1, nº 3. London: The Warburg Institute, 1983, pp. 187-196.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. I. Leiden, Brill, 1975.
BOYCE, Mary: «On the Zoroastrian Temple Cult of Fire», in: Journal of the American Oriental Society, Michigan, Michigan University Press, 1975, pp. 454-465.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. II, Leiden, Brill, 1982.
Boyce, Mary: «Aməša Spənta»Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1989, p. 933-936. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/amesa-spenta-beneficent-divinity
CHRISTENSEN, Arthur E.: Études sur le zoroastrisme de la Perse antique, Copenhagen, 1928.
Darmesteter, James: The Zend-Avesta. Part II: The Sirozahs, Yasts and Nyayis. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2007.
DHALLA, Maneckji Nusserwanji: History of Zoroastrianism. London, Oxford University Press, 1983. Available online: http://www.avesta.org/dhalla/dhalla1.htm#contents
DUMEZIL, Georges: The Destiny of a Warrior. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1970. Availabe online: https://archive.org/details/GeorgesDumezilTheDestinyOfTheWarrior1970
GNOLI, Gherardo and JAMZADEH, Parivash: «Bahram»Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1988, p. 510-514. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/bahram-1#pt1
Lommel, Herman: Die Yašts des Awesta, Göttingen-Leipzig: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht/JC Hinrichs, 1927.
RANFT, Major: The Esoteric Codex: Zoroastrian Legendary Creatures. Lulu.com, 2015.
West, E. W. (trad.): Pahlavi texts. Part I, The Bundahis, Bahman Yast, and Shayast La-Shayast. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 1993.
West, E. W. (trad.): Pahlavi Texts. Part V, Marvels of Zoroastrism. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2004.
West, E. W. (trad.): Pahlavi Texts. Part III, Dina-i Mainog-i Khirad, Sikand-Gümanik Vigar, Sad Dar. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2005.





[1] RAFNT, Major, op. cit., p. 111.
[2] GNOLI, Gherardo, op. cit., p. 1.
[3] Ibídem, p. 2. DUMEZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 117-118.
[4] CHRISTENSEN, Arthur, op. cit., pp. 7-8.
[5] BOYCE, Mary, op. cit., p. 63.
[6] GNOLI, Gherardo, op. cit., p. 2.
[7] Ibídem, p. 3.
[8] Ibídem, p. 4.
[9] DHALLA, Maneckji N., op. cit., p. 194-195.
[10] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 115.
[11] GNOLI, Gherardo, op. cit., p. 3.
[12] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 129.
[13] BOYCE, Mary, op. cit., p. 62.
[14] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 119-120.
[15] DHALLA, Maneckji N., op. cit., p. 195.
[16] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 129.
[17] DUMEZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 131.

Verethraqna, el Espíritu de la Victoria del Zoroastrismo

Verethraqna fue uno de los dioses principales del Antiguo Irán y del mundo iranio en general, empezando por el tiempo de los Aqueménidas. Al parecer sobrevivió a la reforma Zoroástrica desde un culto previo, adquiriendo relevancia total y una posición muy elevada en el panteón con la nueva religión. Se le ha comparado con Hércules y Ares en época Seléucida debido a la influencia helenística, fundamentalmente por sus atributos principales como hipóstasis de la Victoria y por ser conocido como aquel que no puede ser derrotado en combate. Otros de sus nombres pueden ser Warhara, Vehram o Bahrām, como es más conocido.

Verethraqna como cuervo-guerrero, de Jessada-Art
Fuente:  http://www.deviantart.com/art/Verethragna-422778747

· Antecedentes: el mito de Indra y Vṛtra
El mundo indio y el iranio han tenido siempre una relación muy estrecha, y el caso de Verethraqna no es una excepción. Se puede trazar la relación que este personaje tiene con la mitología védica, en concreto con el mito del dios Indra y el monstruo-serpiente Vṛtra. No obstante, Major Rafnt escribió en 2015 que la teoría de los orígenes indo-iranios de Verethraqna había sido superada[1].
La primera conexión se encuentra en el propio nombre del dios avéstico, Verethraqna, que literalmente significa «destructor de los obstáculos»[2]. En lenguaje avéstico existen dos palabras significativas para este artículo y con la misma raíz:
· vərəθraγna, un sustantivo neutro que se utiliza como nombre del dios
· vərəθraγan, un adjetivo que significa «victorioso»
El adjetivo no es exclusivo de la Victoria, sino que se utiliza también para calificar a otros personajes, tanto dioses como héroes, y tiene su correspondiente en la palabra védica vṛtrahán, un famoso epíteto del dios Indra. Entre otras muchas hazañas, una de las grandes victorias de este dios fue eliminar al monstruo Vṛtra, en una batalla por la liberación de las aguas muy parecida a la librada entre Tištrya y Apaoša. Una de las teorías al respecto de la conexión entre Verethraqna e Indra propone que el primero sería un eco del segundo, es decir, que con la reforma religiosa del Zoroastrismo se habrían tomado los epítetos del dios védico victorioso para construir y engrandecer la figura del dios iranio, anulando la capacidad de matar dragones. La segunda teoría más potente sostiene que originariamente había dos personajes en el mundo Indo-Iranio: un dios y un matador de dragones. El Zoroastrismo se quedaría con la figura divina, mientras que India prefirió dar supremacía a Indra colocándolo como asesino de monstruos[3].
De las dos, Gherardo Gnoli opina que la primera es la más probable, teniendo en cuenta que la principal función de Indra no era matar dragones, sino que esto fue un añadido. No obstante, el tema de la vinculación Indra-Verethraqna sigue provocando discordancias, y hay otras muchas teorías sobre por qué es posible relacionarlos o por qué no. No podemos detenernos en todas ellas, pero se encuentran en la bibliografía, por si queda algún lector interesado.

Inmortal, de Macie J. Kuciara
Fuente:  http://www.deviantart.com/art/Immortal-156649935


· El Bahrām Yašt: las diez formas de Verethraqna
El espíritu de la Victoria cuenta con su propio himno dentro del Avesta, los textos sagrados del Zoroastrismo, que comúnmente se conoce como Bahrām Yašt y ocupa el número 14 dentro de la lista de recopilaciones. En él, como en los otros yašt, se encuentran todas las descripciones y características de este dios de manera exhaustiva. Es una de las secciones más antiguas dentro de las escrituras en lo que se conoce como Avéstico Joven, aunque parece estar compuesto a base de parches textuales según lo estudiado por Christensen[4]. Este investigador terminaba concluyendo que es muy complicado establecer qué partes pertenecían originariamente al Bahrām Yašt y cuáles fueron tomadas de otros himnos. Mary Boyce escribía que, aunque no se conservó en tu totalidad, contiene lo que parecen ser elementos muy arcaicos que dan pie a pensar en la verdadera antigüedad de este dios y su culto[5].
Primero enumera las diez formas que podía adoptar y con las que se aparece delante de Zarathustra —lo que recuerda a los avatares de Viṣṇu en la literatura Puránica o a las diez formas que también tenía Indra[6]—. Cada una de estas representaciones contiene un importante contenido simbólico y sería un error considerarlas aleatorias o meramente significativas en lo descriptivo. Las encarnaciones de Verethraqna son una muestra de hasta qué punto él era poderoso, cubriendo prácticamente la totalidad de las criaturas y los elementos sagrados del mundo zoroástrico:
· Un viento furioso (Yt. 14.2-5). Es la forma inicial y aquella con la que se presenta ante Zarathustra como el fuerte, el victorioso, el escogido. Además estos versos hacen referencia a su capacidad para sanar y su relación con la medicina.
· Un toro con cuernos de oro (v. 7). Sobre estos cuernos se dice que descansa la Fuerza y la Victoria, siendo ellas las que han dado forma a los huesos y los han cubierto de oro.
· Un caballo blanco con las orejas y el hocico de oro (v. 9). Aquí repite la descripción anterior, solo que esta vez las virtudes del dios estarían flotando sobre la testuz del animal.
· Un camello (v. 11-13). El texto lo describe como listo para aparearse con otras hembras, lo que destaca la potencia sexual del dios y su patrocinio de la virilidad masculina. También lo vincula a los humanos diciendo que vive en sus hogares como parte del ganado, del que también se encarga, haciendo referencia a su próspera reproducción.
· Un jabalí (v. 15). Este animal tiene una descripción especial, en tanto que no se trata de un jabalí salvaje corriente, sino una especie de criatura fantástica y monstruosa a partes iguales, con varias filas de colmillos afilados e incluso cuernos. También es una criatura muy veloz.
· Un muchacho de quince años (v. 17). Aquí se describe su belleza y su inocencia, aludiendo a la pureza de sus ojos «limpios».
· Un halcón, cuervo o ave de presa (v. 19-21). Esta es una de las formas más famosas, ya que se le describe como el más veloz de los pájaros, capaz de superar la rapidez de una flecha. Su vuelo es lo que determina que la noche se convierta en día y sus plumas tienen propiedades mágicas.
· Un carnero (v. 23). Este carnero posee una fuerza impresionante, que utiliza embistiendo con sus cuernos redondeados.
· Una cabra salvaje (v. 25). Los cuernos de esta cabra están afilados, listos para el combate. Además se acentúa la agilidad para moverse por las montañas del dios.
· Un guerrero adulto y armado (v. 27). Cuando finalmente Verethraqna se presenta en forma de hombre, se describe como armado perfectamente para entrar en combate, con un escudo y una espada con la hoja hecha de oro, decorada con todo tipo de ornamentos. 
Algunas de estas metamorfosis no son exclusivas de Verethraqna. Por ejemplo, Tištrya podía adquirir la forma del muchacho, el toro o el caballo (Yt. 8.13,16,20), el Xᵛarənah o Gloria podía aparecerse como un cuervo (Yt. 19, 35) y la divinidad del Viento, Vayu-Vāta, se representaba con un camello o como un viento impetuoso (Dk, IX, 23.2-3)[7].
Después de enumerar sus encarnaciones, el yašt continúa con la lista de regalos que el espíritu de la Victoria otorga a Zarathustra, siendo el más importante de ellos la victoria en el pensamiento, en la acción y en la palabra. Este último hace referencia a los habituales duelos de retórica, que datan de época Indo-Irania[8]. Como a cualquier otro dios, a Verethraqna se le deben ofrecer libaciones en forma de brotes sagrados y lo que Dhalla describe como «alimento consagrado para el ganado cocinado», de preferencia blanco. Sin embargo, no todos pueden ofrecer estos regalos a dios; únicamente los virtuosos y los puros de corazón deben hacerlo. La calamidad y el desastre caerá sobre aquellos que se atrevan a conjurar al dios siendo malvados, o sobre los justos que compartan estas libaciones con el enemigo. Los textos describen que las plagas asolarán sus tierras, la enfermedad matará a sus familias y el propio Verethraqna les amputará las manos y los pies, además de privarlos primero de la vista y el oído[9]. Está clara la intención de representar al dios como una criatura poderosa a la que se tiene que respetar y venerar, pero también temer por lo terrible de su ira.

Kirin de Daren Horley
Fuente:  https://darenhorley.artstation.com/portfolio/47-ronin-kirin


· Verethraqna, mucho más que un dios combativo
Georges Dumézil escribía: «in Indo-Iranian theology, the functions and functional gods were juxtaposed, thus justifying different moral codes for the different human groups»[10]. Esto se refiere a que la sociedad estaba dividida en grupos distintos a los que amparaban diversas divinidades, ya que tenían necesidades específicas. Verethraqna, como una de las criaturas más destacadas del panteón, debía tocar todos estos grupos de una u otra manera.
Como representación de la Victoria está directamente relacionado con el mundo militar, la fuerza y la destreza en el combate. Prueba de esto son las transformaciones que hacen alusión a su comportamiento guerrero, como el toro, el carnero, la cabra o el jabalí. Sin embargo, no todo su poder tenía que ver con la lucha. Por ejemplo, la forma de camello aludía a su patronazgo sobre la virilidad masculina y la potencia sexual, y el viento describe también que tiene la capacidad de sanar. Además, la magia de sus plumas en la forma de cuervo vincula a Verethraqna con elementos mágicos que se utilizaban en rituales chamánicos y en exorcismos, con la mayoría de los paralelos localizables en India. Existían ciertos oráculos basados en el movimientos descritos por una pluma de cuervo o halcón al caer al suelo[11].
Las diez encarnaciones no se refieren únicamente a la fuerza física del dios ni a su capacidad para guerrear; seis de las diez son formas que se adoptan para correr, haciendo referencia a la velocidad y la agilidad —el viento, el caballo, el camello, el jabalí, el muchacho, el cuervo—[12]. Verethraqna es un espíritu que se considera total, en el sentido de que su popularidad y su relevancia entre las otras criaturas del Zoroastrismo hacían necesario que pudiera cubrir todas las funciones descritas, dejando clara su posición ante los fieles.
En un momento más avanzado del culto, ya época Sasánida, se le hizo protector de aquellos que emprendían viajes. La reforma Zoroástrica y el paso del tiempo tuvieron gran influencia sobre este dios, haciendo que evolucionara hacia una personalidad más intelectual y sus acciones tuvieran un cariz más moral que literal[13]. Según Raftn, aparece en las coronas de los reyes Sasánidas como un ave de presa o únicamente representado a través de sus alas. Existe un escrito, traducido por Jean de Menasce, donde se asciende a Verethraqna a la categoría de Amesha Spenta, los Gloriosos Inmortales que acompañaban a Ahura Mazdā, y que recoge Dumézil[14].

Blue Raven de Dleoblack
Fuente:  http://dleoblack.deviantart.com/art/raven-familiar-301239164


· Las tres regiones del mundo
En el culto zoroástrico, Verethraqna tiene una conexión muy importante con otras dos divinidades: Mithra y Čistā, que representa la Conciencia Sagrada —un rol que más adelante estaría en manos de Daēnā—. En el Mihr Yašt, dedicado a la divinidad solar, Verethraqna aparece a su lado en su forma de terrible jabalí, dispuesto a castigar con la crueldad antes descrita a aquellos que se atrevan a mentir a Mithra, que también representa el pacto sagrado[15]. Según el Avesta, Verethraqna y Čistā serían ambos compañeros de Mithra, y entre sus liturgias se pueden encontrar muchas conexiones[16].
Los yašt garantizan al espíritu de la Victoria el dominio total de las tres regiones del mundo: el cielo, la tierra y el agua. Esto es posible gracias a la maestría visual de Verethraqna, que es desde luego necesaria para alcanzar la victoria. Los ojos del dios lo relacionan directamente con el orden universal, aquel que rige la creación. En el Bahrām Yašt, Zarathustra ofrece tres sacrificios que tres veces son compensados con la misma lista de privilegios, además de un elemento que hace referencia a la visión y que está directamente relacionado con un animal:
· El pez Kara, cuya visión es ilimitada debajo del agua
· Un semental, cuya visión es ilimitada en la tierra
· Un quebrantahuesos, cuya visión es ilimitada desde lo alto del cielo
Estos tres animales también aparecen vinculados a Čistā en el Dēn Yašt (número 16). De este modo, Verethraqna queda vinculado al cosmos en su totalidad. Como escribía Georges Dumézil: «This is another rendition of the god's special relation to the entire cosmos, a necessary attribute for him since, on the one hand, the only truly effective victory must be a total one, and, on the other, the universe, highly interested in the assailant god's victory, must contribute to it with all its elements»[17].

Quebrantahuesos. Fotografía de Isak Pretorius
Fuente: 



· Curiosidades
Japón ha mostrado un interés creciente por la mitología del Zoroastrismo, y Verethraqna no es una excepción. En la serie de animación nipona Campione!, el protagonista recibe de Verethragna, un pequeño y poderoso dios de la guerra, la capacidad de transformarse en diez cosas diferentes para poder completar su misión. En una de las imágenes de la serie se puede ver el círculo con los diez discos correspondientes, que mezclan una iconografía desde mesopotámica hasta griega, como también en su entrada musical, donde aparecen uno detrás de otro y en el mismo orden en que lo hacen en el yašt.

Disco con las encarnaciones de Verethraqna
Fuente: http://thecampione.wikia.com/wiki/Verethragna 




BIBLIOGRAFIA 

BIKERMAN, E.: «Anonymous Gods», in: Journal of the Warburg Institute, vol. 1, nº 3. London: The Warburg Institute, 1983, pp. 187-196.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. I. Leiden, Brill, 1975.
BOYCE, Mary: «On the Zoroastrian Temple Cult of Fire», in: Journal of the American Oriental Society, Michigan, Michigan University Press, 1975, pp. 454-465.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. II, Leiden, Brill, 1982.
Boyce, Mary: «Aməša Spənta»Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1989, p. 933-936. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/amesa-spenta-beneficent-divinity
CHRISTENSEN, Arthur E.: Études sur le zoroastrisme de la Perse antique, Copenhagen, 1928.
Darmesteter, James: The Zend-Avesta. Part II: The Sirozahs, Yasts and Nyayis. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2007.
DHALLA, Maneckji Nusserwanji: History of Zoroastrianism. London, Oxford University Press, 1983. Available online: http://www.avesta.org/dhalla/dhalla1.htm#contents
DUMEZIL, Georges: The Destiny of a Warrior. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press, 1970. Availabe online: https://archive.org/details/GeorgesDumezilTheDestinyOfTheWarrior1970
GNOLI, Gherardo and JAMZADEH, Parivash: «Bahram»Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1988, p. 510-514. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/bahram-1#pt1
Lommel, Herman: Die Yašts des Awesta, Göttingen-Leipzig: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht/JC Hinrichs, 1927.
RANFT, Major: The Esoteric Codex: Zoroastrian Legendary Creatures. Lulu.com, 2015.
West, E. W. (trad.): Pahlavi texts. Part I, The Bundahis, Bahman Yast, and Shayast La-Shayast. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 1993.
West, E. W. (trad.): Pahlavi Texts. Part V, Marvels of Zoroastrism. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2004.
West, E. W. (trad.): Pahlavi Texts. Part III, Dina-i Mainog-i Khirad, Sikand-Gümanik Vigar, Sad Dar. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2005.



[1] RAFNT, Major, op. cit., p. 111.
[2] GNOLI, Gherardo, op. cit., p. 1.
[3] Ibídem, p. 2. DUMEZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 117-118.
[4] CHRISTENSEN, Arthur, op. cit., pp. 7-8.
[5] BOYCE, Mary, op. cit., p. 63.
[6] GNOLI, Gherardo, op. cit., p. 2.
[7] Ibídem, p. 3.
[8] Ibídem, p. 4.
[9] DHALLA, Maneckji N., op. cit., p. 194-195.
[10] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 115.
[11] GNOLI, Gherardo, op. cit., p. 3.
[12] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 129.
[13] BOYCE, Mary, op. cit., p. 62.
[14] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 119-120.
[15] DHALLA, Maneckji N., op. cit., p. 195.
[16] DUMÉZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 129.
[17] DUMEZIL, Georges, op. cit., p. 131.