08 marzo, 2019

Eight Women from Persia’s Ancient History


Commemorating International Women’s Day on March 8th here you have a list of eight fundamental women for the development of Ancient History in Persia. The selected women belong to the Achaemenid (550-330 BCE), Arsacid (224 BCE-240 CE) and Sassanian (240-651 CE) periods. Their roles quite variate but for sure they were relevant for the times they were living at.



1.     Mandana
Mandana was a princess of the Median kingdom, daughter of king Astyages. Her name seems to come from ancient iranian languages and means ‘cheerful’. Mandana’s character is surrounded by myth and few knowledge about her personal life has been collected. She became the spouse of Cambyses I, king of the Persians, and eventually she would be the mother of Cyrus II the Great considered to be founder of the Achaemenid dynasty. According to legends, Astyages had a premonitory dream foreseeing the uprising to power of his grandchild, stealing his power. For that reason, he chose to eliminate the kid after he was born. It was Mandana who hid the baby, who would come back as an adult to claim his legitimate place at the throne of Media. One of the sources containing this story are the works from Herodotus. To what extent this story is certain remains unknown. Possibly Mandana was in fact the daughter of Astyages, but also she could have been used as a nexus between Cambyses, who truly belonged to the Achaemenids, and Cyrus.


2.     Pantea Arteshbod
Pantea was a commander of the Immortals during the reign of Cyrus II the Great. She had great influence on the military panorama. We already dedicated a whole article to her figure. You can read about her by clicking here.

Reenactment of Pantea Arteshbod


3.     Būrāndukht / Pūrāndokht
Daughter of the great Sassanian emperor Khusraw II, Būrāndukht was the first woman who ruled the vast empire his father conquered. For how long she was on the throne it is unknown exactly; it could variate between a year and four months and two years. During her rule she had a coin of her own with her face and name on it, Būrāndukht. Pūrāndukht is the name Ferdowsī used to address her inside her epic poem the Shāh-nāma, the Book of Kings, where she is listed as one of the Sassanian leaders. Būrāndukht accessed the throne after the execution of Khusraw II by his own son, Kavadh II, and the latter death of said son after an epidemy swept through the empire. Her role was fundamental to maintain united the empire’s structure that was going through a cruel civil war. Būrāndukht not only kept unity but also helped reconstructing many infrastructures damaged by said war.  

Coin of Būrāndukht


4.     Āzarmīgdukht
Āzarmīgdukht was queen Būrān’s Little sister and her successor to the throne. She was also a daughter of Khusraw II and ruled for a year, from 630 to 631. She had her own coin as well but chose to represent her father’s face instead of hers. After her sister’s reign, the Sassanid general Shapur-I Shahvaraz auto proclaimed himself ruler and deposed Būrāndukht. However, he was not recognised by some factions who supported the empire and he was immediately deposed to put Āzarmīgdukht back in the throne. Later on, she had one of her suitors killed to avoid the wedding but ended up assassinated herself by this man’s son. After her death, Būrāndukht took over again.

Coin of Āzarmīgdukht



5.     Atossa Shahbanu
Atossa was Cyrus II the Grat eldest daughter, possibly from his marriage with Cassandana. She had a quite agitated life but both Greek and Persian sources coincide when highlighting her sharp intelligence. After some comings and goings, her half-brother Darius I took her as his wife and Atossa started exercising a powerful influence not only in court but also in the military circles. Thanks to her lineage related with Cyrus II she was treated with great devotion and respect. Herodotus’ accounts explain how she suffered from a breat cancer treated by the Greek physicist Democedes of Croton. Atossa’s eldest son was Xerxes I and she made sure he was the candidate to success Darius I despite not being the eldest among his brothers. During the reign of Xerxes I she was still in great consideration due to her queen-mother role.


6.     Irdabama
Irdabama was a woman in charge of her own business during the reign of Darius I and Xerxes I. She belonged to the nobility and she was the owner of great extensions of land, flourishing business of grain and wine as well. The tablets at Persepolis keep registers about the high number of workshops, lands and workers under her control. She owned her own commercial seal and administrated different centres, most of them in the area near of today’s Shiraz. Some of them mustered up to 480 workers. She was in charge of authorising cargo and materials’s transport and her approval was required to put the goods at the market.


7.     Sura of Parthia
Sura, named after the great Arsacid genear Surena, was the daughter of Ardavan V (213-224), the last of the Parthian rulers. According to some sources, she was given the title of sepahbod, general lieutenant of her father’s troops. It is quite difficult to find information about Sura since her being a legendary character is highly possible. Nevertheless, she is still very relevant to contemporary folklore and she is one of the few relevant feminine figures in the Parthian world who accessed the military circles.  

Reenactment of Sura of Parthia


8.     Youtab
Youtab, meaning ‘unique’, was the sister of the legendary hero Aryo Barza, ‘exaltation of the Aryans’. They both were Persian prince and princess; her brother was granted the title of satrap of Persis, the empire’s south province. These two siblings are famous for having commanded the army who confronted Alexander the Great at the Battle of the Persian Gate (330 BCE), a gorge on the Zagros mountains. Youtab and her brother resisted the Macedonian king’s troops for thirty days but eventually Alezander found an alternative route and they were defeated. Sources speak of Youtab’s fierce in combat; she was feared even by her own soldiers.

Persian queen's head. Lapis.
National Museum of Tehran, Iran


Happy International Women’s Day!



BIBLIOGRAPHY

BROSIUS, Maria: Women in Ancient Persia: 559-331 BC. Clarendon Press, 1998.
BROSIUS, Maria: “Women in Pre-Islamic Persia”. Encyclopaedia Iranica, 2015.
DARYAEE, Touraj: Sasanian Persia: The Rise and Fall of an Empire, Tauris, 2008.
SCHMITT, Rüdiger: “Atossa”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 1989.
SCHMITT, Rüdiger: “Amestris”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 1989.
SCHMITT, Rüdiger: “Mandane”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 2012.
SHAHBAZI, A. Shapur “Bōrān”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 1989.

Ocho mujeres de la Historia Antigua de Persia


Con motivo del Día Internacional de la Mujer el 8 de marzo, os traemos la lista de ocho mujeres fundamentales para el desarrollo de la historia antigua de Persia. Las mujeres que hemos seleccionado pertenecen al periodo temporal de las dinastías Aqueménida (550-330 AEC) y Sasánida (240-651 CE), y sus papeles fueron muy diferentes entre sí, pero desde luego relevantes para los tiempos que vivieron.




1.     Mandana
Mandana era una princesa del reino de Media, la hija del rey Astiages. Posiblemente su nombre provenga de las lenguas iranias antiguas y signifique “alegre”. La figura de Mandana está envuelta en mito, y realmente se tienen muy pocos datos sobre su vida personal. Se convirtió en la esposa de Cambises I, rey de los persas, y en la madre de Ciro II el Grande, al que se considera fundador de la dinastía Aqueménida. Según la leyenda, Astiages tuvo un sueño que le advertía que su nieto le arrebataría el poder y por eso decidió eliminarlo al nacer. Mandana fue la encargada de ocultar al bebé, que regresaría años más tarde para reclamar su legítimo lugar en el trono de Media. Una de las fuentes que recoge esta historia son los trabajos de Heródoto. No se sabe hasta qué punto esta historia es veraz, ya que posiblemente Mandana sí fuese hija de Astiages y se utilizase como nexo entre Ciro y Cambyses, que pertenecía a los Aqueménidas.


2.     Pantea Arteshbod
Pantea fue una comandante de los Inmortales durante el reinado de Ciro II el Grande, con gran influencia en el panorama militar. Le hemos dedicado un artículo completo que podéis leer haciendo click aquí.

Recreación de Pantea Arteshbod


3.     Būrāndukht / Pūrāndokht
Hija del gran emperador Sasánida Cosroes II, Būrāndukht fue la primera mujer en gobernar el vasto imperio conquistado por su padre. No se sabe con exactitud cuánto estuvo en el trono; el tiempo que se baraja va desde un año y cuatro meses hasta dos años. durante su reinado, acuñó su propia moneda, donde aparece su rostro y su nombre, Būrāndukht. Pūrāndokht es el nombre con el que Ferdowsī se refiere a ella dentro de su poema épico el Shāh-nāma, el Libro de los Reyes, donde aparece como una de las líderes de los Sasánidas. Būrāndukht accedió al trono después de la ejecución de Cosroes II por su hijo Kavadh II y la posterior muerte de este tras una epidemia que asoló el imperio. Su papel fue fundamental para mantener unida la estructura del imperio, que en ese momento se encontraba sumido en una cruel guerra civil. Būrāndukht no solo mantuvo la unidad, sino que ayudó a reconstruir muchas de las infraestructuras dañadas por dicha guerra.

Moneda de Būrāndukht con su rostro

 
4.     Āzarmīgdukht
Āzarmīgdukht era la hermana pequeña de la reina Būrān y quien la sucedió en el trono. También era hija de Cosroes II y estuvo gobernando un año, de 630 a 631. Acuñó su propia moneda, pero colocó el rostro de su padre en ella en vez de incluir el suyo. Después del reino de su hermana, el general Sasánida Shapur-i Shahvaraz se autoproclamó gobernante y depuso a Būrāndukht. Sin embargo, no fue reconocido por algunas facciones que apoyaban al imperio, e inmediatamente se le depuso para colocar en el trono a Āzarmīgdukht. Más tarde mandó matar a uno de sus pretendientes para evitar la boda, pero también ella acabó asesinada por el hijo de este hombre. Tras su muerte, Būrāndukht volvió a subir al trono.


Moneda de Āzarmīgdukht con el rostro de su padre



5.     Atossa Shahbanu
Atossa fue la hija mayor de Ciro II el Grande, posiblemente fruto de su matrimonio con Casandana. Tuvo una vida tremendamente agitada, pero tanto fuentes griegas como persas coinciden en señalar su aguda inteligencia. Después de algunas idas y venidas, su medio-hermano Darío I la convirtió en su esposa y Atossa pasó a ejercer una poderosa influencia no solo en la corte, sino también en el ámbito militar. Gracias a su linaje emparentado con Ciro II, se la trataba con gran respeto y reverencia. Heródoto nos cuenta cómo sufrió de un cáncer de pecho tratado por el físico griego Demócedes de Croton. El hijo mayor de Atossa fue Xerxes I, y ella se aseguró de que fuese el sucesor de Darío I a pesar de no ser el mayor de sus hermanos. Durante el reinado de Xerxes, siguió siendo tenida en gran consideración en su papel de reina-madre.  


6.     Irdabama
Irdabama fue una mujer a cargo de sus propios negocios durante el reinado de Darío I y Xerxes I. Pertenecía a la nobleza y era la dueña de grandes extensiones de tierra, así como de exitosos negocios del grano y el vino. En las tablillas de Persépolis se han encontrado registros que recogen el elevado número de talleres, tierras y trabajadores a su servicio. Contaba con su propio sello comercial y administraba diferentes centros, la mayoría de ellos cerca de lo que hoy es Shiraz, algunos de ellos con hasta 480 empleados. Ella era quien autorizaba los transportes de las mercancías y daba su aprobación para la salida al mercado.



7.     Sura de Partia
Sura, bautizada en honor del gran general Arsácida Surena, fue la hija de Ardavan V (213-224), el último soberano de los partos. Según algunas fuentes, se le concedió el título de sepahbod, teniente general de las tropas de su padre. Es muy difícil encontrar datos sobre Sura, ya que es posible que se trate de un personaje legendario, pero todavía tiene mucha relevancia para el folklore contemporáneo y es una de las pocas figuras femeninas que alcanzó algún grado militar en tiempo de los partos.

Imagen recreada de Sura de Parthia


8.     Youtab
Youtab, que significa “única”, era la hermana del héroe legendario Aryo Barzan, “la exaltación de los Aryos”. Ambos eran príncipes persas y su hermano alcanzó el título de sátrapa de Persis, la provincia sur del imperio. Estos dos hermanos son famosos por haber comandado el ejército que se enfrentó a Alejandro Magno en la Batalla de la Puerta Persa (330 AEC), un desfiladero en los montes Zagros. Youtab y su hermano resistieron a los ejércitos del rey macedonio durante treinta días, pero finalmente Alejandro encontró un paso alternativo y los derrotó. Las fuentes hablan de la fiereza en batalla de Youtab, a quien incluso sus propios soldados temían.


Busto de una reina persa. Lapislázuli.
Museo Nacional de Irán, Teherán. 


¡Feliz Día Internacional de la Mujer!



BIBLIOGRAFÍA

BROSIUS, Maria: Women in Ancient Persia: 559-331 BC. Clarendon Press, 1998.
BROSIUS, Maria: “Women in Pre-Islamic Persia”. Encyclopaedia Iranica, 2015.
DARYAEE, Touraj: Sasanian Persia: The Rise and Fall of an Empire, Tauris, 2008.
SCHMITT, Rüdiger: “Atossa”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 1989.
SCHMITT, Rüdiger: “Amestris”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 1989.
SCHMITT, Rüdiger: “Mandane”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 2012.
SHAHBAZI, A. Shapur “Bōrān”, Encyclopaedia Iranica, 1989.