29 junio, 2016

Anāhitā, Zoroastrian divinity of Waters

Anāhitā is possibly one of the most famous female divinities from Zoroastrianism, and about her rivers of ink had flown, especially because of her immense popularity and her outstanding role in religious cult from the Achaemenid Persian period on (ca. 700-330 BCE) [1]. This article presents the goddess going back to her origins and to the dawn of the Avestan religion to provide a complete vision of her evolution and of all the sources about her available.

The name of the goddes
In order to present the goddess of waters in a better manner it is necessary to start by her name, about what revolves an interesting controversy and a joint of ideas that must be precisely separated. Despite the most common way of referring to her both in folklore and tradition is Anāhitā, this is not her whole name but a simplification of what once were a group of sacred epithets.
Arədvī Sūrā Anāhitā is the complete designation for this goddess. Sūrā means «mighty», «strong», and Anāhitā is the Avestan word for «immaculate», «undefiled», «pure»[2]. While these two terms are commonly found to address other divinities, the only exclusive one for this creature from the waters was Arədvī, interpreted in an etymological sense by Mary Boyce and Herman Lommel as «moist», «humid», being in addition a feminine adjective[3]. Eventually the proper name fell into disuse into the favour of the fusion of arədvī and sūrā, resulting in the Middle Iranian Ardvīsūr or Ardwīsūr, the way she appears on latter Zoroastrian sources.
As well occurs with many other divinities, Anāhitā finds her roots in a mixture of the Indo-Iranian cult and the Vedic religion heritage. Lommel proposes the Indo-Iranian name to be Saravastī, «she who possesses the waters», who was worshipped in Vedic India and so designated a small yet sacred stream in Madhyadeśa. The Iranian form would be Harāhvastī, name given to the modern region of Kandahar because of it riches in rivers. Originally, Harāhvastī designated in Zoroastrianism a mythical river who fell from the peak of the Sacred Mountain, Harā bərəzaitī, and plunged down to the depths of the creation ocean Vourukaṧa, source of all waters in the world[4].

Morning Star. Mahmoud Farshchian, 1993.


The ābān Yašt
As other renowned Zoroastrian divinities, Anāhitā owns her own yašt or hymn, the ābān Yašt that corresponds to the fifth of this collection and is among the three longer ones with 131 verses. Mary Boyce separates four strands inside its composition:
1)  The first verses would correspond to an ancient celebration of the goddess of the rivers, gathering a pre-Zoroastrian belief, praising her life-giving powers.
2)  Further on and in accordance with the Zoroastrian doctrine the goddess would be presented as created and conceived as a separated existence by Ahura Mazdā himself to help with the struggle of good and evil.
3)  Mary Boyce highlights in a certain amount of verses certain evidences of the cult to statues that by association would correspond to the Semitic goddess Anaïtis, discussed below.
4)  Linking with the former point, Boyce emphasizes the latter additions to the hymn most probably from the reign of Artaxerxes II (404-358 BCE) on, the promoter of the inclusion of Anāhitā/Anaïtis inside the Zoroastrian pantheon. Those extra verses undertake with the task of extolling the Yazata, even showing Ahura Mazdā sacrificing to her alongside with other great heroes from epic Iranian tradition. Boyce points out that the majority of the extensions are borrowings from other hymns such as the Aši Yašt (number 17), dedicated to Fortune and Piety divinity finally eclipsed and even assumed by Anāhitā[5].
These additions would be also tied with a reappearance of the goddess’ popularity in Sassanid period, and it is interesting to recover the theory of Mary Boyce about the disappearance of a hymn to Vouruna, an ancient divinity associated to the Vedic Varuna god of the creation waters. According to Boyce, two verses confirm this usurpation: at the 72 appears the word nipātara, «protector», a masculine adjective not required to define a feminine goddess. Moreover, certain parts are copied from the Mihr Yašt, the hymn to Mithra, of who this disappeared Vouruna would be brother[6].
Some verses are directly repetitive and finally is valid to assume the texts grew from historical processes and the popularity of the divinity was what caused the hymn to be deliberately extended. As a remarkable fact, Boyce writes that this Yašt could be never recited inside a fire temple, not even before a fire[7].

Statue of Anāhitā riding her chariot in Maragha, Iran.
Source:  
http://balkhandshambhala.blogspot.com.es/2014/03/the-art-of-anahita-400-bc.html


«Beautiful, strong maid»
As was indicated above, it is inside the X where the description of Anāhitā as a goddess can be found, both physically and with her divine attributes and powers. Anāhitā presents herself as a beautiful, strong maid (XIX, 78), of white arms (I, 7) and clad with golden square earrings, a golden necklace, girded her waist tightly so her breasts look well shaped (XXX, 127), crowned by a golden tiara with hundred stars, eight rays and fillets streaming down (XXX, 128), wrapped by beaver skins (XXX, 129).
Anāhitā drives a chariot drawn by four mighty horses: Wind, Cloud, Rain and Sleet (XVIII, 120). She bestows the fertility, purifies the semen of the males and the wombs of the females (I, 2). In addition she makes the milk flow from women’s breasts and she nourishes the crops and the herds (I, 3). Like other ancient countries, exists the association of the waters and wisdom, since it is she the priests and wise worship for knowledge (XXI, 86).   
It is quite curious that such a benevolent and pacific in appearance goddess could be at the same the guarantor of providing war chariots, weapons and household goods (XXX, 130), as well as helping to destroy the enemies and achieve the victory in battle (IX, 34) as happened in the episode of Aži Dahāka and Thraētaona (to read further on this story, just click here). This warlike aspect of Anāhitā seems to had been taken from Aši, the Yazata of Fortune, in this assimilation of the verses belonging to her hymn as explained above[8].

Chariot drawn by four horses. Piece of the Oxus Treasure.
Achaemenid, 5th-4th cent. BCE. Currently at the British Museum.


Anaïtis, the Semitic goddess, and her assimilation
As formerly pointed, the popularity of Anāhitā shot up from the Achaemeid dynasty on due to the identification of this Indo-Iranian goddess with another character from the Semitic tradition: goddess Anaïtis. Achaemenids are native from the province known as Persis by the Greeks, settled in the surrounding territories of Persepolis, Pasargadae and Naqš-e Rostam[9]. Contacts with both Greek and Semitic tribes made the devotion to this goddess Anaïtis survive the conversion to Zoroastrianism of the Achaemenids, and it was royal influence the way of including her in the pantheon by merging her with the Zoroastrian agent of the waters. It turned out convenient the epithets to be so similar (Anāhitā – Anaïtis). Artaxerxes II himself (404-359 BCE) invoked this divinity after Ahura Mazdā and Mithra, giving her an outstanding role on the cult.
At this moment the incorporation of the new verses to the X happened. Anāhitā was no more the wild mythical river but a beautiful maid richly clad. No other descriptions of divinities are so detailed, what reinforces the theory of the additions serving the interest of the ruling family.
Anaïtis was the rendering name of the planet Venus in Greece and her cult was powerfully influenced by the Mesopotamian figure of Inanna/Ishtar. Some Zoroastrian texts treat them separately, presenting Ardvīsūr as the river and Anāhid as the star. For instance, the Bundahišn shows Ardvīsūr as the origin of the world’s waters (Gbd., 10.2, 5) and Anāhid as the origin of the planets and parallel to Venus (GBd., 5.4). Nevertheless, in other verses the divinities are already merged (GBd. 3.17) [10].

Coin of the Sassanid king Narseh (293-302 CE)


The problematic identification of Anāhitā in the arts
Prof. Dr. Bier writes about the how this goddess represents one of the most complex iconographic problems of identification, since it rests primarily on her forms, attributes and performing actions, what shows up as pretty risky[11]. It was at the time of the Sassanids (224-651 CE), whose rulers performed as high priests of this divinity, when the number of the assumed representations shot up, being the main center of cult the city of Eṣṭar.
«Neither the images in art nor the architectonical monuments correspond precisely to descriptions in literature, and none of the numerous (contested) attributions to her images and sanctuaries rests upon firm ground»[12], writes Bier. At the time of the Sassanids appeared multiple iconographies of feminine figures in the famous gilded silver plates. They are normally represented naked or scantly clad, associated to birds, children, flowers or grapes. Nevertheless, affirming these are Anāhitā is adventurous since there is not a real connexion between the image and the sources. Artists and builders did not establish a correlation between the imagery and the verbal tradition.
What is indeed accepted is the feminine figure appearing on the reverse of many coins struck by several Sassanian kings could be Anāhitā in her role of investiture of the kings[13]. This would lead to identify the figures from Naqš-e Rostam as Anāhitā crowning king Narseh (293-302) and the ones in Ṭāq-e Bostān as the goddess crowning king Khosrow II Parviz (590-628).

Anāhitā in the rock reliefs of Naqš-e Rostam. Getty Images. 


The role of Waters in Zoroastrianism
Water is the primordial source of life in Zoroastrianism, the one that nourishes plants, animals and mankind. It is considered the second of the seven creations (dahišnān) the world was divided in sky, waters, earth, plants, animals, mankind and fire, and according to the cosmological thought it filled the lower half of the spherical sky, just beneath the earth. 
The great ocean Vourukaṧa was the gathering place of waters and it was connected to the mythical river Harāhvastī Arədvī Sūrā. Two rivers were flowing out of it, Vaŋhvī Dāityā to the East and Raŋha to the West. According to Bundahišn this two tributaries encircled the Earth (Bd., 11.100.2 y 28.8) and were cleansed in the tidal ocean Pūtika to then go back to Vourukaṧa. At the same centre of this ocean grew the mountain Us.həndava, around whose summit gathered vapours that were scattered as rain clouds (Bd. 9.8). Henceforth all water on earth came from the mythical ocean, and from the great lakes to the small creeks everyone could be considered as a representation of the sacred water[14].
This leaded to an important amount of libations and offerings towards the water, what is known as āb-zōhr. Before the sacrifice or worship, water was poured on the ground. Due to its sacred nature it could not be drawn from the dwells when it was dark as that was the time belonging to the daēvas. Same way it was prohibited carrying out offerings or celebrations during the night at the sanctuaries[15], whose in the large majority of the cases were natural springs[16].


Dukes Creek Falls, Georgia's Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest.
Photograph by Cothron Photography, Alamy





BIBLIOGRAPHY
BIKERMAN, E.: «Anonymous Gods», in: Journal of the Warburg Institute, vol. 1, nº 3. London: The Warburg Institute, 1983, pp. 187-196.
BIVAR, A. D. H. and BOYCE, Mary: «Eṣṭaḵr», Encyclopædia Iranica, New York, Routledge & Kegan Pau, Vol. VIII, Fasc. 6, 1989, pp. 643-646.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. I, Leiden, Brill, 1975.
BOYCE, Mary: «On the Zoroastrian Temple Cult of Fire», in: Journal of the American Oriental Society, Michigan, Michigan University Press, 1975, pp. 454-465.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. II, Leiden, Brill, 1982.
Boyce, Mary: «Āban», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983a, p. 58. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/aban
Boyce, Mary: «Āb», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983b, p. 58. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/ab-i-the-concept-of-water-in-ancient-iranian-culture
Boyce, Mary: «Āban Yašt», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983c, p. 60-61. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/aban-yast
Boyce, Mary: «Anāhīd», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983d, pp. 1003–1009. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/anahid
Cumont, Franz: «Anahita», in Hastings, James, Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics 1, Edinburgh, T. & T. Clark, 1926. Available online: https://archive.org/details/encyclopaediaofr03hastuoft
Darmesteter, James: The Zend-Avesta. Part II: The Sirozahs, Yasts and Nyayis. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2007.
Göbl, Robert: Sasanian Numismatics, Brunswick, Klinkhardt & Biermann, 1971.
GRAY, Louis H.: «A List of the Divine and Demonic Epithets in the Avesta», in: Journal of the American Oriental Society, vol. 46, New York, The American Oriental Society, 1926, pp. 97-153.
Lommel, Herman: Die Yašts des Awesta, Göttingen-Leipzig: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht/JC Hinrichs, 1927.
Lommel, Herman: «Anahita-Sarasvati», in Schubert, Johannes; Schneider, Ulrich, Asiatica: Festschrift Friedrich Weller Zum 65. Geburtstag, Leipzig: Otto Harrassowitz, 1954, pp. 405–413.
SCHMIDT, R.: «Achaemenid Dynasty», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983, pp. 414-426. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/achaemenid-dynasty#pt2







[1] SCHMIDT, R., op. cit., p. 1.
[2] BOYCE, Mary (1982), op. cit., p. 202; LOMMEL, Herman (1927), op. cit., p. 29.
[3] BOYCE, Mary (1983c), op. cit., p. 1003; LOMMEL, Herhman, (1927), op. cit., p. 29.
[4] BOYCE, Mary (1983a), op. cit., p. 58.
[5] BOYCE, Mary (1983c), op. cit., p. 60.
[6] Ibídem, p. 61.
[7] Ibídem.
[8] Ibídem.
[9] SCHMIDT, R., op. cit., p. 414.
[10] BOYCE, Mary (1983d), op. cit., p. 1008.
[11] Ibídem.
[12] Ibídem, p. 1009.
[13] Göbl, Robert, op. cit., pp. 36-51.
[14] BOYCE, Mary (1983b), op. cit., p. 58.
[15] Ibídem.
[16] BOYCE, Mary (1983d), op. cit., p. 1008.

Anāhitā, la divinidad de las Aguas en el Zoroastrismo

Anāhitā es, probablemente, una de las divinidades femeninas más conocidas del Zoroastrismo, y sobre ella se han vertido ríos de tinta, especialmente por su inmensa popularidad y destacado papel en el culto religioso a partir del periodo persa Aqueménida (ca. 700-330 AEC)[1]. En este artículo se presenta a la diosa remontándose a sus orígenes y al principio de la religión avéstica, para dar una visión completa de su evolución y de todas las fuentes disponibles sobre ella.

El nombre de la diosa
Para presentar mejor a la diosa de las aguas, es necesario empezar por su nombre, alrededor del cual gira una interesante controversia y una agrupación de ideas que es preciso separar. A pesar de que la forma más común de llamarla tanto en el folklore como en la tradición es Anāhitā, este no es su nombre completo, sino una simplificación de lo que en su día fueron un conjunto de epítetos sagrados.
Arədvī Sūrā Anāhitā es la designación completa de esta diosa. Sūrā quiere decir «fuerte», «poderosa», y Anāhitā es la palabra en avéstico para «inmaculada», «la que no ha sido corrompida», «pura»[2]. Mientras que estos dos términos es común encontrarlos para referirse a otras divinidades, el único que era exclusivo para esta criatura de las aguas era Arədvī, que Mary Boyce y Herman Lommel han interpretado en sentido etimológico como «húmeda», «acuosa», que es además un adjetivo femenino[3]. Con el tiempo, el nombre correcto iría cayendo en desuso hasta crear una fusión de arədvī y sūrā, que resultaría en Ardvīsūr o Ardwīsūr, el nombre en persa medio, que es la forma en la que aparece en los textos más tardíos del Zoroastrismo.
Como ocurre con otras tantas divinidades, Anāhitā tiene su raíz en una mezcla del culto indo-iranio con la herencia de la religión védica. Lommel propone que el nombre indo-iranio era Saravastī, «aquella que posee las aguas», a la que se adoraba en la India Védica y que además designaba un pequeño río sagrado en Madhyadeśa. La forma irania sería Harāhvastī, nombre que se le daba a la moderna región de Kandahar por la abundancia de sus fuentes naturales. Originariamente, Harāhvastī designaba en el Zoroastrismo un río mítico que caía desde lo alto de la Montaña Sagrada, Harā bərəzaitī, y que se zambullía en las profundidades del océano de creación Vourukaṧa, el nacimiento de todas las aguas de la tierra[4].

Estrella de la Mañana. Mahmoud Farshchian, 1993.

El ābān Yašt
Como otras divinidades destacadas del Zoroastrismo, Anāhitā tiene su propio yašt  o himno, el ābān Yašt, que corresponde al quinto de esta colección y se encuentra entre los tres más extensos con 131 versos. Mary Boyce diferencia cuatro facetas diferentes dentro de su redacción:
1)  Los primeros versos corresponderían a una exaltación de la diosa de los ríos, recogiendo una creencia pre-Zoroástrica, alabando sus poderes como dadora de vida.
2)  Más adelante, y ya de acuerdo a la doctrina Zoroástica, se presentaría a la diosa como creada y concebida como existencia separada por el propio Ahura Mazdā para que ayudase en la lucha del bien contra el mal.
3)  En unos cuantos versos Mary Boyce señala ciertos indicios del culto a estatuas, que por asociación serían de la diosa semítica Anaïtis, de la que se hablará más adelante.
4)  Enlazando con el punto anterior, aquí Boyce hace hincapié en los añadidos del himno, muy probablemente a partir del reinado de Artaxerxes II (404-358 BCE), impulsor de la inclusión de Anāhitā/Anaïtis en el panteón Zoroástrico. Estas adiciones se encargan de ensalzar la figura de la Yazata, llegando hasta a mostrar a Ahura Mazdā ofreciéndole un sacrificio, junto con todos los grandes héroes de la tradición épica irania. Boyce señala que la mayoría de estas extensiones son préstamos de otros himnos, como el Aši Yašt (número 17), dedicado a la divinidad de la Piedad y la Fortuna que finalmente fue eclipsada e incluso asumida por Anāhitā[5].
Estos añadidos también se vinculan con un rebrote de la popularidad de la diosa en época Sasánida, y es interesante recuperar la teoría de Mary Boyce sobre la desaparición de un himno a Vouruna, una antigua divinidad relacionada con la védica Varuna —dios de las aguas de creación—. Según Boyce, son dos los versos que confirman esta usurpación: en el 72 aparece la palabra nipātara, «protector», que es un adjetivo masculino y que no tendría por qué ser utilizado para definir a una diosa femenina. Además, ciertas partes están copiadas del Mihr Yašt, el himno a Mithra, de quien este desaparecido Vouruna sería hermano[6].
Algunos versos son directamente repetitivos, y finalmente no se puede sino asumir que el texto creció fruto de los procesos históricos, y que fue esta popularidad lo que provocó que fuera deliberadamente extendido. Como dato destacable, Boyce cuenta que este Yašt nunca se recitaba dentro de un templo al fuego, ni siquiera próximo a una hoguera[7].


Estatua de Anāhitā conduciendo su carro en Maragha, Irán.
Source:  
http://balkhandshambhala.blogspot.com.es/2014/03/the-art-of-anahita-400-bc.html

«Hermosa, poderosa dama»
Tal y como se señala arriba, es en el ābān Yašt donde se encuentra la descripción de Anāhitā como diosa, tanto físicamente como con sus atributos divinos y sus poderes. Anāhitā se presenta como una bella y poderosa dama (XIX, 78), de brazos blancos (I, 7) y ataviada con pendientes dorados de forma cuadrada, un collar de oro, ceñida su cintura para marcar bien la forma de su pecho (XXX, 127), coronada con una tiara de oro con un centenar de estrellas, ocho rayos y piezas ondulantes colgadas (XXX, 128), y abrigada con  pieles de castores (XXX, 129).
Anāhitā conduce un carro tirado por cuatro poderosos caballos: Viento, Nube, Lluvia y Granizo (XVIII, 120). Es la garante de la fertilidad, la purificadora del semen de los varones y de los úteros de las mujeres (I, 2). Además es ella la que hace la leche fluir de los pechos y la que nutre los cultivos y los rebaños (I, 3). Como en otras culturas antiguas, existe una asociación del agua con la sabiduría, ya que es a ella a quienes los sacerdotes y sabios suplican por conocimiento (XXI, 86).
No deja de ser curioso que una diosa tan benévola y de apariencia en principio pacífica sea también la garante de proporcionar carros de guerra, armas y bienes para las familias (XXX, 130), como también ayudar en la destrucción de los enemigos y a conseguir la victoria en la batalla (IX, 34), cosa que ocurre en el episodio de Aži Dahāka y Thraētaona (si quieres leer más sobre esa historia, haz click aquí). Esta faceta bélica de Anāhitā parece haber sido tomada de Aši, el Yazata de la Fortuna, en esa asimilación de los versos que pertenecían a su himno y que arriba se ha explicado[8].


Carro tirado por cuatro caballos. Pieza del Tesoro de Oxus.
Aqueménida, ss. V-IV AEC. The British Museum.

Anaïtis, la diosa semítica, y su asimilación
Como se ha señalado previamente, la popularidad de Anāhitā se disparó a partir de la dinastía Aqueménida debido a la identificación de esta diosa indo-irania con otro personaje del culto de tradición semítica: la diosa Anaïtis. Los Aqueménidas son originarios de la provincia conocida por los griegos como Parsis, asentados en los territorios alrededor de Persépolis, Pasargadae y Naqš-e Rostam[9]. El contacto con pueblos griegos y semíticos hizo que la devoción por esta diosa Anaïtis sobreviviese a la conversión al Zoroastrismo de los Aqueménidas, y fue la influencia real el medio para incluirla en el panteón, fusionándola con la representante zoroástrica de las aguas. Fue incluso conveniente que hasta los epítetos fuese parecidos (Anāhitā – Anaïtis). El propio Artaxerxes II (404-359 AEC) invocaba a esta nueva divinidad después de Ahura Mazdā y Mithra, dándole un papel muy destacado en el culto.
Fue en este momento cuando se produjo la incorporación de los nuevos versos al ābān Yašt. Anāhitā ya no era el impetuoso río mítico, sino una hermosa mujer ricamente ataviada. Es interesante que no existen descripciones tan detalladas de ninguna otra divinidad, lo que refuerza esta teoría de las adiciones so interés de la familia gobernante.
Anaïtis era el nombre de la representación del planeta Venus en Grecia, y su culto estaba poderosamente influenciado por la figura de Inanna/Ištar de Mesopotamia. Algunos de los textos del Zoroastrismo aún la separan de Anāhitā, señalando que existe Ardvīsūr, el río, y Anāhid, la estrella. Por ejemplo, el Bundahišn señala a Ardvīsūr como el origen de todas las aguas de la tierra (GBd., 10.2, 5), y a Anāhid como el origen de todos los planetas y paralela a Venus (GBd., 5.4). Sin embargo, en otros versos las divinidades ya aparecen fusionadas (GBd., 3.17)[10].


Moneda del rey Sasánida Narseh (293-302 CE)

La problemática identificación de Anāhitā en las artes
Escribe el doctor Bier que es muy complicado identificar iconográficamente a Anāhitā, ya que hay que basarse fundamentalmente en su forma, sus atributos y las actividades que aparece desempeñando[11], y esto es una actividad bastante arriesgada. Fue con la dinastía de los Sasánidas (224-651 EC), cuyos gobernantes llegaron a actuar como sumos sacerdotes de esta divinidad, cuando el número de supuestas representaciones se disparó, siendo probablemente el mayor centro de culto la ciudad de Eṣṭaḵr.
«Neither the images in art nor the architectonical monuments correspond precisely to descriptions in literature, and none of the numerous (contested) attributions to her images and sanctuaries rests upon firm ground»[12], escribe Bier. En época Sasánida aparecen múltiples iconografías de figuras femeninas en los famosos platos de plata sobredorada. Suelen representarse desnudas o ataviadas con telas vaporosas, y asociadas a pájaros, niños, flores o racimos de uvas. Pero afirmar que estas se tratan de Anāhitā es atrevido, ya que no existe una conexión real entre la imagen y las fuentes. Los artistas y constructores no intentaron establecer una correlación entre la imaginería y la tradición verbal.
Lo que sí está aceptado es que la figura femenina que aparece en el reverso de muchas monedas de reyes Sasánidas sí puede tratarse de Anāhitā, en su papel de investir a los monarcas[13]. Esto lleva a identificar a las figuras de Naqš-e Rostam como Anāhitā coronando al rey Narseh (293-302), y las de Ṭāq-e Bostān como la diosa coronando a Khosrow II Parviz (590-628).


Anāhitā en los relieves de piedra de Naqš-e Rostam. Getty Images. 

El papel de las Aguas en el Zoroastrismo
El agua es la fuente principal de la vida en el Zoroastrismo, la que nutre a las plantas, los animales y los seres humanos. Está considerada la segunda de las siete creaciones (dahišnān) en las que estaba dividido el mundo —el cielo, el agua, la tierra, las plantas, los animales, los seres humanos y el fuego—, y según el pensamiento cosmológico llenaba la mitad inferior del cielo esférico, justo debajo de la tierra.
El gran océano Vourukaṧa era el lugar donde todas las aguas se reunían, y estaba conectado con el río mítico Harāhvastī Arədvī Sūrā. De él brotaban dos ríos, el Vaŋhvī Dāityā al este y el Raŋha al oeste. Según el Bundahišn, estos dos afluentes rodeaban la tierra (Bd., 11.100.2 y 28.8) y se purificaban en el océano agitado Pūtika para volver de nuevo a entrar en Vourukaṧa. En el centro de este océano crecía la montaña Us.həndava, alrededor de la cual se concentraban los vapores que más tarde se condensarían para formar el agua de la lluvia (Bd., 9.8). De esta manera, todo el agua de la tierra provenía de este océano mítico, y desde los grandes lagos a los pequeños arroyos, todos podían considerarse como representaciones del agua sagrada[14].
Esto provocaba una gran cantidad de libaciones y ofrendas ante el agua, lo que se conoce como āb-zōhr. Antes de realizar los ritos se derramaba agua en el suelo. Debido a su naturaleza sagrada, no se podía tomar el agua de los pozos o los ríos en las horas de oscuridad, puesto que esas les pertenecen a los daēvas. Del mismo modo, estaba prohibido realizar ofrendas o celebraciones durante la noche en los santuarios[15], que en una gran mayoría de los casos eran fuentes naturales[16].


Dukes Creek Falls, Georgia's Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest.
Photograph by Cothron Photography, Alamy






BIBLIOGRAFÍA
BIKERMAN, E.: «Anonymous Gods», in: Journal of the Warburg Institute, vol. 1, nº 3. London: The Warburg Institute, 1983, pp. 187-196.
BIVAR, A. D. H. and BOYCE, Mary: «Eṣṭaḵr», Encyclopædia Iranica, New York, Routledge & Kegan Pau, Vol. VIII, Fasc. 6, 1989, pp. 643-646.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. I, Leiden, Brill, 1975.
BOYCE, Mary: «On the Zoroastrian Temple Cult of Fire», in: Journal of the American Oriental Society, Michigan, Michigan University Press, 1975, pp. 454-465.
BOYCE, Mary: A History of Zoroastrianism, vol. II, Leiden, Brill, 1982.
Boyce, Mary: «Āban», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983a, p. 58. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/aban
Boyce, Mary: «Āb», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983b, p. 58. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/ab-i-the-concept-of-water-in-ancient-iranian-culture
Boyce, Mary: «Āban Yašt», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983c, p. 60-61. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/aban-yast
Boyce, Mary: «Anāhīd», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983d, pp. 1003–1009. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/anahid
Cumont, Franz: «Anahita», in Hastings, James, Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics 1, Edinburgh, T. & T. Clark, 1926. Available online: https://archive.org/details/encyclopaediaofr03hastuoft
Darmesteter, James: The Zend-Avesta. Part II: The Sirozahs, Yasts and Nyayis. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass, ed. 2007.
Göbl, Robert: Sasanian Numismatics, Brunswick, Klinkhardt & Biermann, 1971.
GRAY, Louis H.: «A List of the Divine and Demonic Epithets in the Avesta», in: Journal of the American Oriental Society, vol. 46, New York, The American Oriental Society, 1926, pp. 97-153.
Lommel, Herman: Die Yašts des Awesta, Göttingen-Leipzig: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht/JC Hinrichs, 1927.
Lommel, Herman: «Anahita-Sarasvati», in Schubert, Johannes; Schneider, Ulrich, Asiatica: Festschrift Friedrich Weller Zum 65. Geburtstag, Leipzig: Otto Harrassowitz, 1954, pp. 405–413.
SCHMIDT, R.: «Achaemenid Dynasty», Encyclopædia Iranica 1, New York, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983, pp. 414-426. Available online: http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/achaemenid-dynasty#pt2




[1] SCHMIDT, R., op. cit., p. 414.
[2] BOYCE, Mary (1982), op. cit., p. 202; LOMMEL, Herman (1927), op. cit., p. 29.
[3] BOYCE, Mary (1983d), op. cit., p. 1003; LOMMEL, Herhman, (1927), op. cit., p. 29.
[4] BOYCE, Mary (1983a), op. cit., p. 58.
[5] BOYCE, Mary (1983c), op. cit., p. 60.
[6] Ibídem, p. 61.
[7] Ibídem.
[8] Ibídem.
[9] SCHMIDT, R., op. cit., p. 414.
[10] BOYCE, Mary (1983d), op. cit., p. 1008.
[11] Ibídem.
[12] Ibídem, p. 1009.
[13] Göbl, Robert, op. cit., pp. 36-51.
[14] BOYCE, Mary (1983b), op. cit., p. 58.
[15] Ibídem.
[16] BOYCE, Mary (1983d), op. cit., p. 1008.